woensdag 28 september 2016

True replicas: Ye, the model- and mould maker



In Jingdezhen there are almost endless different neighborhoods specialized in different steps in the process of making ceramics. From clay refining to glaze mixing and from throwing pots in all sizes and shapes to carving incredible detailed decorations.  This process of porcelain making and all its steps are portrayed in the Museum of the Imperial Kiln site in the city. Today I was in Sculpture factory, one of these areas visiting Ye. He is modeling with and after my 3D prints, thus repairing the fractures and missing pieces. This resulted in a series of slibcasting moulds in plaster for porcelain casting. 







vrijdag 16 september 2016

True replicas: function and materiality




We reconstruct the past from 'sources': objects, remains and texts. They are discovered, excavated, collected and preserved, serving as sources to reconstruct and study our history. As a society, we derive our identity, our ‘sense of belonging’ from this heritage - these objects. But as soon as these objects became historical source and put in museums and storage, they left some of their soul behind.  These utensils lost their function, their nearness and role in human lives, their materiality.

With True replicas I want to give these objects their soul back: their function and the experience of their materiality. Therefore I use the replica, aiming to stretch the boundaries of traditional notions of the replica as an autonomous object based on a historical source. The replica as a means to give back a historical 'untouchable' object its function and material experience.

The goal of the project is not to make the most literal copy of the original. I want to use 3D prototyping technology combined with the traditional techniques used in the original to make these replicas. Merging material and immaterial heritage. Here in Jingdezhen I will explore how I can replicate a series of 17th century Chinese porcelain by using 3D scanning an printing techniques and by applying the ongoing tradition of porcelain production that still is (almost) unchanged since the production of the originals. The whole process of making these replicas will play a essential role in these new objects. Looking for true replicas in its most literal sense.

zondag 11 september 2016

True Replicas: the objects

Together with Archeologist Steven Jongma of Delft Heritage, I sellected 5 objects excavated in Delft. They all date back to the 17th century, are made of porcelain and are manifactured in China, probably Jingdezhen. This kind of porcelain was made specially for the export marked, following the 'western taste'. Some are broken and restored, some are broken and just put together.

'Klapmuts': A-2-21, excavated in 1972

'Klapmuts': A-2-21, excavated in 1972

cup, DL 88 V15

cup, DL 88 V15

'Klapmuts' OLD 74-1-1, excavated in 1974

'Klapmuts' OLD 74-1-1, excavated in 1974

Bowl, V4/7, excavated in 1986

Bowl, V4/7, excavated in 1986

Bowl, V4/7, excavated in 1986

Cup with relief, OKL 3

Cup with relief, OKL 3



woensdag 7 september 2016

True Replicas: to Delft and back


In the city of Delft porcelain cups, bowls and dishes are excavated that in the 17th century where imported from China and produced in Jingdezhen. Objects that where highly valued and loved for their elegant shapes, blue and white decoration and above all for their magical material: porcelain. Objects that where used in daily lives to display, to drink and eat from.
With the Archaeologists of Delft Maaike Roozenburg has selected a series of these excavated porcelain artefacts. In cooperation with the Delft Technical University she has made 3D scans of these objects and converted them into 3D models and prints. Roozenburg brought them back to their city of origin and will combine them with the expertise in making and decorating porcelain still alive in Jingdezhen and let this serve as a basis for a new collection of porcelain. A new design collection on the intersection of history and design of east and west combining tangable and intangable heritage.

archeological objects: 17th century chinese porcelain excavated in Delft soil

3D print in nylon by Mareco Prototyping
archeological object: 17th century chinese porcelain excavated in Delft soil

Atec 3D scan


dinsdag 6 september 2016

True Replicas: International Studio Jingdezhen

David Derksen, Hans van Bentum and myself will work on our projects for Museum het Prinsenhof at the International Studio Jingdezhen, run by Ryan Mitchell. The studio is situated in Taoxichuan, a vast area of the formal 'Universal' plate factory in Jingdezhen. This formal factory is tuned into a new centre of ceramics in the city, where artists studios, gelleries and workshops are housed in beautifuly restored factory buildings. Its a privilege and a pleasure to be able to work in this setting full of energy and vision for the future build on the old ceramic tradition and to be geast at the International Studio.

International Studio Jingdezhen 





maandag 5 september 2016

True Replicas: just arived in Jingdezhen

I Just arrived in Jingdezhen, the world capital of porcelain. The city in South China where lays the origin of this magical material, that became so wanted all over the world. I am invited by Museum Prinsenhof in Delft to develop work for the exhibition at this museum about Prcelain from the emperial kilns. I wil work on this project together with artist and sculptor Hans van Bentem and designer David Derksen. The first impression of the city is overwelming: porcelain is everywhere!


 

zaterdag 27 augustus 2016

Now (27&28th of August) on show at DROOG Amsterdam: True Replicas

foto: Jantien Roozenburg

The two projects presented here examine how 3D prototyping and virtual techniques can be utilised to bring the stories of our heritage back into daily life.

3D prototyping are emerging technologies that offer new possibilities to render physical objects into digital data and vise versa, such as 3D-scanning and -printing. With Augmented Reality one can add virtual layers of contextual information on to an object, that can than be discovered using an application on a smartphone or tablet.  With Augmented Reality, objects are enriched and transformed into information carriers that can enrich the story of an object beyond the walls of a museum, archive or a library. Bringing the story of our heritage to our kitchen tables.

The underlying questions we seek to answer with these projects are; What is the meaning stored  in  all these historical objects? How does the story behind an object change our perception and appreciation of that object? What is the relevance of these objects in our increasingly digital and virtual society? How are these stories relevant to us today? Augmented Reality and 3D prototyping offer opportunities to investigate answers to these questions.



foto: Jantien Roozenburg

foto: Jantien Roozenburg

foto: Jantien Roozenburg